Tomato Juicer

If you have ever tried to make your own tomato juice or sauce you know the value of having a tomato juicer in your kitchen. Squeezing tomatoes by hand while it is in a large pot is not appealing to many people and the resulting product usually contains many small seeds and bits of skin.

Many hand tomato juicers on the market resemble an upside down funnel and come with a mallet to force the juice through the funnel holes which are small enough to keep the seeds from mixing in with the juice. By removing the skin before running them through the juicer you can help to keep it from getting clogged up.

To remove the skin you can submerge tomatoes in boiling water for about 10 to 15 seconds and then dunk them in cool water so your hands won’t get burned when you peel them. The skin should then be easy to peel off using nothing but your hands and they can then be placed in the tomato juicer and forced through to the bowl sitting underneath.

Tomato Juicer Hassles

Not everyone wants to hassle with this manual process like my Mom used to and today there are electric tomato juicers that can extract more juice in less time with no effort at all.

In fact, a decent regular juicer can be used as a tomato juicer but the tomatoes should be peeled first to prevent the skin from clogging the machine. This is still much better than the old hand strained method and will easily product more juice from the same number of tomatoes.

If you are going to be processing a large number of tomatoes you might want to look into getting a steam extractor to make your tomato juice and sauce. These work by placing the tomatoes and a little water into a pot with a sealed lid over heat. When the tomatoes reach about 165 degrees F the juice is forced out of a small hose at the bottom and into an awaiting jar. Yes a bit more work than a regular tomato juicer but for volume it can’t be beat.